Convincing Organizations to Say “Yes to InfoSec”


security turned on in smartphoneSecurity departments have their hands full. The first half of my career was government-centric, and we always seemed to be the “no” team, eliminating most initiatives before they started. The risks were often found to outweigh the benefits, and unless there was a very strong executive sponsor, say the CEO or Sector President, the ideas would be shelved.

More recently, as a response to the security “no” team, IT staff started several “Shadow IT” projects. People began using cloud computing systems and pay-as-you-go strategies on a corporate credit card to quickly develop and roll-out projects before anyone in security could get a word in.

These “beg forgiveness” aspects hamstrung security on several projects, especially if a data leakage incident occurred or breach was in progress. What’s more, we weren’t unique in seeing shadow projects. These projects increasingly become the norm as IT staff looking to move initiatives forward come up against cybersecurity professionals hell-bent on maintaining security and, who know that in the event of a breach, heads could easily roll. Most likely theirs.

Tired of being seen as the “no” team? Here are three ideas that could reshape the value of security to your company as a whole:

Demonstrate Trust

Trust messages needs to come from outside of the department, even if it’s ghostwritten or created internally. Be it the CTO, CFO or CEO, there needs to be a bit of understanding that risk comes in many forms, and the Security Department takes all of those into account before approving or denying projects.

Many compliance frameworks have an HR or training domain, and some security departments successfully use this for mandatory training for topics like phishing. When a non-infosec colleague clicks on a fake attack, the trust point may be reiterated with a reminder of example fines and the costs. Breach notifications or PCI violations aren’t cheap after all.

Show Security as a Business Enabler

Share a couple of department wins, where the security team found involvement early in the process and added value to the program deployed. Look for examples like oAuth or Single Sign On (SSO) simplifying a portal’s usage or a project where business continuity planning or encryption helped pass an acceptance audit.

Demonstrating that security builds team success and is no longer the “no” department pays dividends.

Provide Educational Incentives

Lastly, extend the educational aspect beyond testing for ignorance. See if your organization offers reimbursement or even bonuses for security certifications, and stand-up internal lunch-and-learn or video conference preparation sessions. If your organization doesn’t provide an across-the-board financial incentive, maybe fund a raffle for five of the folks who pass the test to receive a spot bonus.

Hopefully, you’ll find these as an opportunity to impress upon the rest of the corporation the importance of the CISO’s office. There’s a long history of “no;” without efforts on the infosec staff’s part, that image will linger well past its truth.

Jon-Michael C. Brook, Principal at Guide Holdings, LLC, has 20 years of experience in information security with such organizations as Raytheon, Northrop Grumman, Booz Allen Hamilton, Optiv Security and Symantec. He is co-chair of CSA’s Top Threats Working Group and the Cloud Broker Working Group, and contributor to several additional working groups. Brook is a Certified Certificate of Cloud Security Knowledge+ (CCSK+) trainer and Cloud Controls Matrix (CCM) reviewer and trainer.

[Cloud Security Alliance Blog]

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