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IT & TECHNOLOGY, Palo Alto Networks

Tech Docs: How Secure is Your Internet Gateway?


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One of the cheapest and easiest ways for an attacker to get into to your network is through users accessing the Internet. By successfully exploiting an endpoint, an attacker can take hold in your network and begin to move laterally toward an end goal, whether that is to steal your source code, exfiltrate your customer data, or take down your infrastructure. To protect your network from cyberattacks and improve your overall security posture, implement a Best Practice Internet Gateway Security Policy.

A best practice Internet gateway security policy has two main security goals:

  • Minimize the chance of a successful intrusion—Unlike legacy port-based security policies that either block everything in the interest of network security, or enable everything in the interest of your business, a best practice security policy leverages App-ID™, User-ID™, and Content-ID™ to ensure safe enablement of applications across all ports, for all users, all the time, while simultaneously scanning all traffic for both known and unknown threats.
  • Identify the presence of an attacker—A best practice Internet gateway security policy provides built-in mechanisms to help you identify gaps in the rulebase and detect alarming activity and potential threats on your network.

These best practices work because they employ methodologies (shown in the infographic below) that help you reduce your attack surface and enable detection and prevention of both known and unknown threats at all stages of the attack lifecycle.

Remember, security doesn’t come in a box. When deciding whether to implement a best practice Internet gateway security policy, answer the following questions: Are you using an application-based security policy? Blocking dangerous URLs and file types? Scanning for known and unknown threats? Decrypting traffic? If you answered no to any of these questions, you have room to improve your security posture. Get started now.

[Palo Alto Networks Research Center]

About @PhilipHungCao

@PhilipHungCao, SACS, CISM, CCSP, CCSK, GICSP, CASP, CIW-WSP, PCNSE7, ACSP, CCDA, DCSE, JNCIA, MCTS, MCSA, VCP5-DCV, VCP6-NV, ZCNT is a #TekF@rmer. He has 16 years' experience in ICT/Cybersecurity industry in various sectors & positions.

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@PhilipHungCao

@PhilipHungCao

@PhilipHungCao, SACS, CISM, CCSP, CCSK, GICSP, CASP, CIW-WSP, PCNSE7, ACSP, CCDA, DCSE, JNCIA, MCTS, MCSA, VCP5-DCV, VCP6-NV, ZCNT is a #TekF@rmer. He has 16 years' experience in ICT/Cybersecurity industry in various sectors & positions.

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